Confirmation

 

    St. Catherine Parish

    Confirmation 2018


St. Catherine's Faith Formation for the Sacrament of Confirmation is now under the direction of North Seattle Catholic Youth (NSCY).  Students from all 7 parishes who are involved with NSCY will be participating in Confirmation Prep.  Confirmation is the last of the Sacraments of Initiation, and the first step in our life long journey of becoming the Saints God created us to be.

To foster this life-long faith journey, Confirmation is in conjunction with our youth ministry NSCY. This means it is expected that all Confirmation candidates are participating in the Sunday Gathering's offered by NSCY.  Students who will reach the age of 16 before April 1, 2018, are invited to join us in January for Confirmation Prep.  Confirmation Prep will consist of 8 sessions that go deeper into the spirituality of the candidate and the teachings of the Church.  Sessions will be offered at two different times, and families can choose which one works best for them. 

Confirmation will start up again next Fall.

For more information on dates and class topics, please visit: www.nseattlecatholicyouth.org

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ACTS 8:14-17

Now when the apostles at Jerusalem heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent to them Peter and John, who came down and prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit; for it had not yet fallen on any of them, but they had only been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Then they laid their hands on them and they received the Holy Spirit”

Quotes to guide us:
 

Christian Initiation: General instruction, n.2

“By signing us with the gift of the Spirit, confirmation makes us more completely the image of the Lord and fills us with the Holy Spirit, so that we may bear witness to him before all the world and work to bring the Body of Christ to its fullness as soon as possible.

Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1316

The sacrament of Confirmation perfects Baptismal grace; it is the sacrament which gives the Holy Spirit in order to root us more deeply in the divine filiation, incorporate us more firmly into Christ, strengthen our bond with the Church, associate us more closely with her mission, and help us bear witness to the Christian faith in words accompanied by deeds.

Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1317

We become Christians by a process of conversion—metanoia in Greek, which means literally “turning around.” Conversion is a process of turning from a life of selfishness and sin—a “Me First” life—to a life of Spirit-filled generosity and love.  And Christ, through the Church, has provided us with sacraments—ritual ceremonies—which help us appropriate and celebrate this conversion process. The Sacraments of Initiation are an ongoing invitation into this lifelong process of conversion.Confirmation, like Baptism, imprints a spiritual mark or indelible character on the Christian’s soul.

 

At confirmation we receive the gifts of the Holy Spirit and confirm our baptismal promises. Greater awareness of the grace of the Holy Spirit is conferred through the anointing of chrism oil and the laying on of hands by the Bishop.

Confirmation perfects Baptismal grace; it is the sacrament which gives the Holy Spirit in order to root us more deeply in the divine filiation, incorporate us more firmly into Christ, strengthen our bond with the Church, associate us more closely with her mission, and help us bear witness to the Christian faith in words accompanied by deeds. (CCC 1316)

Through the Sacrament of Confirmation we renew our baptismal promises and commit to living a life of maturity in the Christian faith. As we read in the Lumen Gentium (the Dogmatic Constitution of the Church) from the Second Vatican Council:

Bound more intimately to the Church by the sacrament of confirmation, [the baptized] are endowed by the Holy Spirit with special strength; hence they are more strictly obliged to spread and defend the faith both by word and by deed as true witnesses of Christ. (no. 11)

Scriptural Foundation for Confirmation
In the Acts of the Apostles we read of the coming of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost. While baptism is the sacrament of new life, confirmation gives birth to that life. Baptism initiates us into the Church and names us as children of God, whereas confirmation calls us forth as God’s children and unites us more fully to the active messianic mission of Christ in the world.

After receiving the power of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, the Apostles went out and confirmed others, showing confirmation to be an individual and separate sacrament: Peter and John at Samaria (Acts 8:5-6, 14-17) and Paul at Ephesus (Acts 19:5-6). Also the Holy Spirit came down on Jews and Gentiles alike in Caesarea, prior to their baptisms. Recognizing this as a confirmation by the Holy Spirit, Peter commanded that they be baptized (cf. Acts 10:47).

For on him the Father, God, has set his seal. (John 6:27)

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